I was born in Manila, and as a chef, I wish I could say that I cook amazing Filipino food, but I’ve mostly cooked Western food my entire life. One thing I could say is, I have tried to incorporate Filipino flavours especially in baking. Although sometimes, that feels a little bit like taking the easy way out. I am proud of my heritage, and maybe someday I would go back and learn more about native ingredients and incorporate them in my cooking as well.

Here, I’m sharing with you my ube cheesecake recipe La Viña style. What is it? You know how a crustless, burnt cheesecake have been trending for a few years? One that is more commonly know as Basque Cheesecake? Well, this is the ube version, with homemade ube jam as well. I call it La Viña cheesecake because that’s the name of the restaurant in San Sebastian where people flock to have a taste of the original version. It is a crustless cheesecake that is caramelised outside and soft in the middle.

 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Joanne | Mrs.FancyPants (@mrs.fancypants.recipes)

If you want the original recipe as per the video above, I published my easy to follow recipe here. Just remember whichever version you are making, start with room temperature ingredients so the batter incorporates quickly and you will not get a lumps. The idea is to get a caramelised outside that serves as your crust, so this entails baking at a very high temperature. I preheat my oven to 220C and line a 23cm or 9in springform with baking paper and ensure there is an overhang. The overhang protects the cheesecake from getting too burnt too fast, and it also supports the cheesecake when it puffs up, which prevents overflowing.

Now with the ube version, it is also straightforward to make with the addition of making your own ube jam. Why would you want to make an ube version? Because my recipe of this is absolutely delicious and the natural purple colour of ube gives this (and basically most ube desserts) a really pretty purple hue. Ube jam is basically cooked ube, pureed and mixed with milk and sugar and cooked until its thick like peanut butter or Nutella. Let your ube jam cool to room temperature before using it for the cheesecake. I use all the ube jam yield in this recipe, but feel free to double the batch because it is really nice on warm bread rolls with a touch of butter.

To make the cheesecake, combine the ube jam, cream cheese, eggs, cream and sugar in a large bowl. Mix until smooth then sift over flour and fold in until incorporated. Pour the batter in your lined springform and bake for 1 hour. The cheesecake will still be jiggly in the centre. Remove from oven and let cool on a rack for at least 2 hours. Serve at room temperature to retain that soft, custardy texture. If you have leftovers, you can eat it as is or reheat in the microwave for 10sec per slice to get that softness back.

The detailed recipe is below for you to try. I would love to see your finished products, so tag me on your social media posts @mrs.fancypants.recipes or use #mrsfancypantsrecipes. If you have any questions, feel free to comment below. ???? Happy baking!

 
Difficulty: Easy

Ube Cheesecake à la La Viña

Makes 1 x 23cm springform

My ube variation of the famed Basque burnt cheesecake!

Ingredients

    For the ube jam (halaya)
  • For the cheesecake

Instructions

0/7 Instructions
    First make the ube jam:
  • Place ube and water in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, lower heat to a simmer, and cover. Simmer until ube most of the water has evaporated.
  • Remove from the pan and transfer to a large bowl. Use a masher to finely mash the ube, or if using grated ube, this step shouldn't be necessary. Push through a fine sieve for a really smooth texture, optional.
  • Mix together mashed ube, milk, and sugar then transfer to a frying pan. Cook over low heat, stirring constantly to avoid burning for 30 minutes uncovered. Add butter cubes and continue cooking until the ube has a deep purple colour and very thick consistency similar to peanut butter spread. Cool down to room temperature.
  • Make the cheesecake
  • Start with room temperature ingredients. Preheat oven to 220C. Line a 9” springform with baking paper, make sure you have an overhang of at least 5cm.
  • Mix cream cheese, ube, sugar and cream. Add eggs one by one, fully incorporating after each addition. Sift flour into the batter and mix just until the flour is incorporated. Do not over mix.
  • Pour into the pan and bake for 60 minutes. The top should be caramelised but cheesecake should be jiggly.
  • Take out of the oven and rest for at least 2 hours at room temperature. Serve warm, consume immediately. (see notes if making ahead)

Notes

  1. Note on UBE: This can be purchased from Asian/Filipino stores. If fresh ube is unavailable, you can use grated ube.
  2. Note on milk: I use jersey cow milk because there's no carabao milk available in Australia. But you can use normal full cream milk from the supermarket. Light or skim milk doesn't give the same richness to the ube jam.
  3. For leftovers: If you have leftovers, you can eat it as is or reheat in the microwave for 10sec per slice to get that softness back.
  4. Update on sweetness: To make the cheesecake less sweet, you can reduce the sugar in the ube jam by 50g.

In my Strawberry Cheesecake Post I discussed what a ganache is, and mentioned that it has plenty of uses. My recipe today also uses a ganache but with a different ratio and I use this to glaze my Ube Butter Cake. Last time, I incorporated the ganache in the cheesecake to help it set and have form instead of using gelatine, this time I used it as a decorative topping to make my cake look lovely and also to enhance the ube flavour.

Now, the cake recipe today is baked in a 10-cup bundt pan. What is a bundt pan you say? Bundt pans are cake pans that look like donuts because they have a tube in the middle. They also have different designs that make your cake look spectacular (when you get the cake out correctly). You’ll see the bundt pan I have in my video below, but if you don’t own one and still want to make this cake, don’t fret! You can use a large loaf pan instead.

https://youtu.be/rXdGhEJcNTs

This cake is a variation of my vanilla butter bundt. I wanted to make an ube flavour to commemorate Filipino Food Month. Filipino flavours and Filipino food don’t tend to be as popular as other cuisine, and Filipino Food Month is the Government’s initiative to give it a push globally since Filipinos are all over the world. Now this cake is not traditionally from the Philippines, however, ube is a well-known native flavour of the Philippines. Ube is a root crop also known as purple yam. It’s colour gives desserts a vibrant pop but this doesn’t translate to a strong flavour, instead its flavour is very mild–a little nutty with a hint of vanilla. It is widely used in local desserts, and one day I will post an actual traditional Filipino ube dessert when I get my hands on fresh ube again. But for now, here is the recipe for this delicious and easy to make butter cake. Happy baking!

 
Difficulty: Easy

Ube Butter Cake

makes 1 x 10-cup bundt pan

   

Ingredients

    For the cake
  • For the glaze

Instructions

0/8 Instructions
    Make the glaze:
  • Place the white chocolate in a medium bowl.
  • Bring the cream to the boil then pour on top of chocolate. Cover and let sit for a minute. Stir vigorously with a wooden spoon until glossy.
  • Add ube. Stir until smooth. Set aside to cool.
  • Make the cake
  • Preheat oven to 170C. Mix yogurt, eggs and vanilla tin a medium bowl.
  • In your stand mixer bowl using a paddle attachment, mix together flour, sugar, b. soda and b. powder. Slowly add the liquid ingredients. Mix until smooth.
  • Add butter cubes one by one. The batter should look creamy. Grease your 10-cup bundt. Make sure you grease all the folds and edges for quick release.
  • Pour batter into the pan and bake for 1 hour or until a skewer comes out clean. Remove from oven. Cool for 10 minutes inverted on a wire rack.
  • The cake should separate from the bundt tin successfully. Pour the glaze all over and serve.

Notes

  1. If you do not have a bundt pan, this should also work with a large loaf pan.
  2. Grease your bundt pan well to make sure the cake come out easily. If it doesn't, try using a butter knife to loosen the edges of the cake as well as the middle tube.
  3. Keeps well at room temperature for 2 days, or in the fridge for 5 days. Always serve at room temperature.

 

What is ube? Ube is purple yam grown in the Philippines. It has a distinct bright purple colour and belongs to the sweet potato family. Ube has a sweeter, more mellow taste than its orange relatives and is popularly used in desserts in Filipino cuisine. I think every Filipino living overseas buy jars of ube jam to take back with them every time they visit the Philippines. I know I do!

When I go home, I normally hunt down a specific brand of ube jam. It’s from North Luzon, and is called Mountain Maid, but is more popularly know as the Good Shepherd ube jam. This specific brand is part of a social enterprise by the Sisters of Charity of the Good Shepherd, and the proceeds from the sales of the products send the less fortunate youth to school.

I take a couple of bottles–okay, maybe 4–home with me and chuck them in the freezer. They last forever in the freezer, as long as you don’t pop the seal. Now, not everyone travels to the Philippines, so if you want to try and make these today, head to your nearest Filipino/Asian store and ask them if they have ube conserve or jam. Some of them would have frozen mashed ube and that works too, just thaw completely and drain excess liquid before using.

Now, ube has a very mellow flavour profile. So, aside from the amount of ube conserve in this recipe, I added ube flavouring as well. Again, this is available in your nearest Filipino/Asian store.

Super easy and quick to whip up, try this as your next baking project. Crunchy top and soft inside, next time you’re catching up with a Filipino mate, you can impress them by making a batch!

 
Difficulty: Easy Prep Time: 10 Mins Cook Time: 28 Mins Total Time: 38 Mins

Ube (purple yam) Muffins

Makes 5 extra large or 12 standard muffins

What is ube? Ube is purple yam grown in the Philippines. It has a distinct bright purple colour and belongs to the sweet potato family. It has a sweeter, more mellow taste than its orange relative and is popularly used in desserts in Filipino cuisine.

Ingredients

Instructions

0/3 Instructions
  • Preheat oven to 200 degrees C. Line muffin tin with paper cases.
  • In a large bowl, mix flour, cornflour, sugar and baking powder. In a separate bowl mix milk, olive oil, egg, flavouring and ube conserve until smooth. 
Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients and stir in wet ingredients just until combined. 
DO NOT OVER MIX. 

  • Fill muffin cups 3/4 full. Sprinkle coarse sugar on top of each muffin. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean. 


Notes

You can normally buy ube flavouring and ube conserve or ube jam from Filipino stores globally. Sometimes they even have frozen mashed ube, which you can also use. If you have access to fresh ube, you can make your own. Just peel and cut into smaller pieces and boil until super soft then drain and mash. The mashed ube should be 150g in weight.

Tags

#filipino  #muffin  #ube